LibriVox 11th Anniversary Collection - tg

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
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Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 21st, 2016, 4:16 pm

Note: Sue Anderson is the Book Coordinator for this project, and for the time-being the DPL too.

LibriVox 11th Anniversary Collection

This project is now complete! All audio files can be found on our catalog page: http://librivox.org/librivox-11th-anniversary-collection/

"LibriVox is a hope, an experiment, and a question: can the net harness a bunch of volunteers to bring books in the public domain to life..."
Hugh McGuire, LibriVox's founder, August 9, 2005

This year is the 11th anniversary of our beloved LibriVox. The readings in this collection celebrate that "bunch of volunteers" who make up the worldwide LibriVox community. The readings are held together by their connection to the number "eleven." The collection is multilingual. The selections, which are chosen by the readers, include fiction, nonfiction, poems, short stories, and articles.


Guidelines:
1) There is a limit of one selection per reader.

2) The selection must be in the public domain. For clarification of what it means for a work to be "in the public domain," please see this section of the LibriVox Wiki: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Copyright_and_Public_Domain. Please stick to works that run less than 60 minutes.

3) There are no reserved spots and no need to "sign up." If you want to post what you have picked out to read, so somebody else doesn't read it first, that is ok, but spaces will be filled as recordings are received. If what you want to read relates to the number "eleven" and is in the public domain, just start recording!

4) We will start with 22 sections (twice times 11), and see how it goes from there. The collection will close at the end of July.

After 22 or more recordings are submitted, we will prooflisten, catalog and make them available to the public.

Basic Recording Guide: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Newbie_Guide_to_Recording

1. RECORD
  • Be sure to set your recording software to: 44100Hz, 16-bit
  • At the BEGINNING Say: "[Title of Work], by [Author Name]" "This is a Librivox recording, read in honor of the 11th anniversary of LibriVox. All Librivox Recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit Librivox.org"
  • At the END, say: "End of [Title], by [Author Name]"
  • If you wish, you may also say: "Read by ... your name.
  • Please leave no more than 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning of your recording. Add 5 seconds of silence at the end of your recording, or 10 seconds if longer than 30 minutes.
2. EDIT and SAVE your file:
  • Need noise-cleaning?Listen to your file through headphones. If you can hear distracting background noise, you may want to clean it up a bit. The latest version of Audacity (Mac/Win) has much improved noise-cleaning. See this LibriVox wiki page for a complete guide. Note: Noisecleaning with old versions of Audacity is not recommended.

  • Save or export your recording to an mp3 file at 128kpbs using the following filename and ID3 tag format:
  • File Name: (all lower case. Please omit a, the, etc from title): eleven_titleofwork_authorlastname_yourinitials_128kb.mp3

  • ID3 Tags: (NOTE: ID3 tags are now optional - they are added automatically during cataloging)
    • • Title/Name: [Title]
      • Artist: [Author Name]
      • Album: LibriVox 11th Anniversary Collection
3. SUBMIT your recording:

Please upload your finished recording using the LibriVox uploader: http://librivox.org/login/uploader. When your upload is complete, you will receive a link - please copy and post to the current Reader's Wanted: Short Works thread. If you don't post the fact that you've uploaded your recording, the book coordinator won't know that you did it!
Image
If you have trouble reading the image above, please send a private message to any admin.
To upload, you'll need to select the MC, which for the 11th Anniversary Collection is TriciaG.
*If this doesn't work, or you have questions, please check our How To Send Your Recording wiki page.

4. POST the following information in this thread:
  • • The link you copied from the uploader to your file
    • Source from which you read (i.e. Gutenberg or other etext url. NOTE: If posting a Gutenberg link please provide the link to the download page, e.g. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/# where # is the PG project number for the book.)
    • Length in minutes.
    • If this is your first Librivox recording, We will also need your name as you would like it to appear on the catalog page and the URL of your homepage if you have one and would like it linked to your name on the catalog page.

Want to see if what you plan to record has been done already?
Search by keywords in the Catalog Search
http://librivox.org/newcatalog/
But don't let this stop you from recording your own version!

5. DEADLINE FOR EDITS on recordings you have submitted:
We ask that you complete any editing requested by the Dedicated Proof Listener within two weeks of the request, or, if you need more time than this, that you post in this thread to request an extension. There’s no shame in this; we’re all volunteers and things happen. Extensions are, however, at the discretion of the Book Coordinator.

Magic Window:



BC Admin
Last edited by Sue Anderson on July 19th, 2016, 3:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 21st, 2016, 4:16 pm

The last day to add your reading or song to the 11th anniversary collection is fast approaching! :birthday:

It's almost time to cut the birthday cake! LibriVox celebrates its 11th anniversary on August 10th. In order to have this collection cataloged by the big day, we need to set a cut off date for contributions. That will be this coming Sunday, July 31st at 8 p.m.

Whoa, you say, Sue you should know we're an international group of volunteers. You're saying Sunday at 8 p.m., but Sunday at 8 p.m. in what time zone? Don't fret! I came up with a fix for that problem. I've set the cut off time for contributions as Sunday, 8 p.m., Galapagos Islands time!

You can check your local time against Galapagos Islands time here: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/ecuador/galapagos-islands. As a hint, London is 7 hours ahead of Galapagos Islands time, New York 2 hours ahead, Chicago 1 hour ahead, and Los Angeles 1 slow turtle hour behind.

We have two ways to celebrate!

Reading! (You're on the right LibriVox thread to do that.)
and
Singing! (To sing the LibriVox 11th Anniversary Song, go to this thread: viewtopic.php?f=24&t=61540)

Why not do them both! :birthday:
Last edited by Sue Anderson on July 28th, 2016, 6:41 am, edited 5 times in total.

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » June 21st, 2016, 4:41 pm

Too bad I didn't wait a for couple more projects to start before starting this one. This is project 11009; it would have been fun to be project 11011. :lol:
By John Muir: Our National Parks
Essays on Psychology and Crime: On the Witness Stand
New York scenes, 1897: Darkness and Daylight
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5

Monaxi
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Post by Monaxi » June 21st, 2016, 5:30 pm

Hello Sue. First of all, bravo and thank you for taking this on.

I'd like to record Psalm 11 in the KJV. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+11&version=KJV
Peace be with you,
Sister

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 21st, 2016, 7:28 pm

Monaxi wrote:Hello Sue. First of all, bravo and thank you for taking this on.

I'd like to record Psalm 11 in the KJV. https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+11&version=KJV
Thank you, Monaxi! :)

AdeledePignerolles
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Post by AdeledePignerolles » June 21st, 2016, 7:56 pm

Are you going to do an anniversary song? Please? :)
Adele

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 22nd, 2016, 4:29 am

AdeledePignerolles wrote:Are you going to do an anniversary song? Please? :)
An anniversary song? Ooooh . . . Well, I'll put it this way. One of the great things about LibriVox is that it draws together people of many varied interests and talents in a friendly, non judgmental way, and gets them to rub shoulders a little, and learn something new. Anyone who stays around LibriVox a while generally gets to the point that they realize they can pop their head over the top of their self dug lifestyle fox hole without being shot dead. So, maybe they take a part in a play, or read a poem out loud or do something else that interests them, but, well, they didn't want to make a fool of themselves, etc. etc., and then they find out they can do it. That's about where I was when I started BCing the nonfiction collection a couple of years ago.

But, an anniversary song? I'll have to admit that group sung songs are a facet of LibriVox that I know exist but that I've never explored and know absolutely nothing about. It seems to me that, if Ruthie has actually retired as song coordinator (?), then this would be a great opportunity for somebody else (not me) to step up and . . . sing!

commonsparrow3
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Post by commonsparrow3 » June 22nd, 2016, 4:52 am

I'd like to read The Eleventh Hour (1914) by the New York Telephone Company, the exciting and informative tale of how Mrs. Daugherty was able to arrange a party at the last minute thanks to the modern marvel, the telephone.

In the course of hunting for something Elevensy to read, I also discovered several other items. Since I can only read one item myself, I'll post the others here as suggestions for anyone else looking for ideas:
Dawson '11, Fortune Hunter, by John T. McCutcheon (It's a novel, but someone might select an excerpt from it)
The Adventures of the Eleven Cuff-Buttons by James Francis Thierry, a delightful Sherlock Holmes parody (Also a novel, but an excerpt might do)
Eleven days in the Militia During the War of the Rebellion by Louis Richards
The Eleventh Hour in the Life of Julia Ward Howe
Number Eleven, A Hospital Story from A Book About Doctors by John Cordy Jeaffreson
The Eleventh Commandment from Lights and Shadows of Real Life by T.S. Arthur

About a song - I always found Ruth's anniversary songs completely charming. I'm not much of a singer, but they always were so much fun I couldn't resist participating. I've written occasional parody poems for family and friends, and might be able to come up with some eleventh anniversary lyrics if I put my mind to it. If I can't, maybe someone else can write them. I do enjoy editing, and will happily volunteer to edit the song, even if I don't end up writing it.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 22nd, 2016, 5:34 am

commonsparrow3 wrote:I'd like to read The Eleventh Hour (1914) by the New York Telephone Company, the exciting and informative tale of how Mrs. Daugherty was able to arrange a party at the last minute thanks to the modern marvel, the telephone.

About a song - I always found Ruth's anniversary songs completely charming. I'm not much of a singer, but they always were so much fun I couldn't resist participating. I've written occasional parody poems for family and friends, and might be able to come up with some eleventh anniversary lyrics if I put my mind to it. If I can't, maybe someone else can write them. I do enjoy editing, and will happily volunteer to edit the song, even if I don't end up writing it.
That's great, Maria! :)

I'm looking forward to your recording and to the lyrics for the 11th anniversary song! Thanks for the reading suggestions too.

I think the number "eleven," as in the "eleventh hour," by its very hint of suspense and forward anticipation, has held fascination for many writers.

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 23rd, 2016, 7:53 am

Hi, I'm tossing my handful of confetti in the air to celebrate LibriVox's 11th anniversary, with this selection:

How to Furnish and Decorate an Eleven Hundred Dollar Cottage , from The Decorator and Furnisher magazine (1890).

https://librivox.org/uploads/triciag/eleven_elevenhundreddollarcottage_decoratorandfurnisher_sa_128kb.mp3
https://archive.org/details/jstor-25586232
7:27

It has been pointed out to me that my $1100 cottage makes no provision for indoor plumbing; but, ah, the dining room has a gold frieze, with ornament in "citron emplevined with gold." Grandiose you say? Well, my problem was not with the color scheme, but with the word "emplevined," which, as far as I could figure out, does not exist in any dictionary. What to do? I mulled it over for a quite a while, and, finally, in true LibriVox fashion, said "emplevined with gold" loud and clear, with as much braggadocio as I could muster.

If anyone else encounters words they find curious or comely in their 11th anniversary readings, it would be fun to hear about them here! :)

MaryinArkansas
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Post by MaryinArkansas » June 23rd, 2016, 8:27 am

A chapter from this book could be a nice selection for the 11th anniversary. I don’t know if Gutenberg or Archive.org is preferred by LibriVox, so have included links to both. However, I must point out that Chapter 1 on Archive is appropriately 11 pages long! :)

"A Voyage in the Yacht ‘Sunbeam’
Our Home on the Ocean for Eleven Months
"
Gutenberg link:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14836/14836-h/14836-h.htm
"A Voyage in the Yacht ‘Sunbeam’
Our Home on the Ocean for Eleven Months
"
Archive.org link:
https://archive.org/details/voyageinyachtsun00bras
Mary

“Once you have read a book you care about, some part of it is always with you.”

Louis L’Amour
Marsupial's Books

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 23rd, 2016, 8:31 am

mhhbook wrote:A chapter from this book could be a nice selection for the 11th anniversary. I don’t know if Gutenberg or Archive.org is preferred by LibriVox, so have included links to both. However, I must point out that Chapter 1 on Archive is appropriately 11 pages long! :)

"A Voyage in the Yacht ‘Sunbeam’
Our Home on the Ocean for Eleven Months
"
Gutenberg link:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14836/14836-h/14836-h.htm
"A Voyage in the Yacht ‘Sunbeam’
Our Home on the Ocean for Eleven Months
"
Archive.org link:
https://archive.org/details/voyageinyachtsun00bras
Thanks, Mary! :)

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 23rd, 2016, 11:59 am

The approximate periodicity of a sunspot cycle is 11 years.

Who knew? Wikipedia, of course. Check out interesting facts about eleven here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/11_(number)

For more about that 11 year sunspot cycle, try this article from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/SunspotCycle.shtml

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » June 23rd, 2016, 5:06 pm

Moving to Readers Wanted. :)
By John Muir: Our National Parks
Essays on Psychology and Crime: On the Witness Stand
New York scenes, 1897: Darkness and Daylight
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » June 24th, 2016, 8:07 am

Armistice Day, November 11 . . . To quote from Wikipedia, "Armistice Day is commemorated every year on November 11 to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I, which took effect at eleven o'clock in the morning—the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" of 1918."


I recently happened across an Armistice Day speech which Woodrow Wilson gave in 1923. The speech can be found on a US. Park Service website "Teaching with Historic Places," an interesting website for any history minded LibriVoxer: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/teachingwithhistoricplaces/index.htm. Wilson's home in Washington D.C.is a U.S. National Historic Landmark.

Wilson's "struggle to achieve lasting world peace following WWI," is amply demonstrated in his powerful speech, which perhaps someone might like to read for our 11th anniversary collection: https://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/14wilson/14facts3.htm

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