COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 082 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » April 23rd, 2021, 6:23 pm

Thanks for the edits, Craig. Kant is PL OK.

saoussen
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Joined: January 22nd, 2021, 8:58 am

Post by saoussen » April 23rd, 2021, 7:19 pm

title: Black America, 1895
author: Dorothy Berry

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_blackamerica,1895_dorothyberry_saoussen_128kb.mp3

link to the essay: publicdomainreview.org/essay/black-america-1895#9-0
17:45
i was looking for a shorter NF works yesterday and came across this interesting essay. hope it sounds good :D

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » April 24th, 2021, 6:37 am

saoussen wrote:
April 23rd, 2021, 7:19 pm
title: Black America, 1895
author: Dorothy Berry

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_blackamerica,1895_dorothyberry_saoussen_128kb.mp3

link to the essay: publicdomainreview.org/essay/black-america-1895#9-0
17:45
i was looking for a shorter NF works yesterday and came across this interesting essay. hope it sounds good :D
Hi Saoussen, Thank you for your continuing interest in recording for the Short Nonfiction Collection. Unfortunately, the essay you have sent us is not in the Public Domain, and we cannot accept it for the SNF.

You are not the first person to be misled by a name: The Public Domain Review. The Public Domain Review is an on-line publication which publishes articles written by contemporary authors based on public domain documents. In this case, the essay by Dorothy Berry clearly states "published on February 24, 2021." The article also gives Dorothy Berry's bio at the end of the article:" Dorothy Berry is the Digital Collections Program Manager at Houghton Library at Harvard University." https://www.dorothy-berry.com/

Please review what it means "to be in the Public Domain" in the LibriVox Wiki: http://wiki.librivox.org/index.php/Copyright_and_Public_Domain.

You are free to read, for the SNF, any of the Public Domain sources cited by Berry at the end of her article.

Just so you don't feel that you are alone in not understanding the difference between a public domain document and an essay based on public domain documents, I have dug up an old post I made in 2018 in the thread for the 57th volume of the SNF, which deals with the same problem.

Sue Anderson wrote:
May 10th, 2018, 6:25 pm
adr6090 wrote:
May 10th, 2018, 4:49 pm
Hello,
I have recorded an essay about the Krakatoa volcano. I hope it is suitable for this thread.


https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf057_krktsnsts_hamblyn_adr_128kb.mp3 time: 12:00
Name of essay: The Krakatoa Sunsets
author: Gerard Manley Hopkins 28 July 1844 – 8 June 1889
http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/05/28/the-krakatoa-sunsets/

This is such an addiction & I already have 2 other essays that I would love to contribute to this thread, providing this one passes. :thumbs:
Hi April, We're pleased that you are excited about recording for the NonFiction Collection, and your topic, the Krakatoa Sunsets sounds absolutely fascinating. What we need for you to do, however, is read something about the sunsets that is is strictly in the public domain.

What you have sent us today is an essay which combines quotes from historical public domain documents plus an introduction and interpretation written by Richard Hamblyn, a contemporary writer and historian born in 1965. https://richardhamblyn.wordpress.com/about/. The 1883 letters Hamblyn quotes are in the public domain, but his essay is not, and therefore we cannot use it for LibriVox.

Fortunately, Hamblyn provides a list of and links to the public domain works he consulted for his article at the end of his essay. Here you will find links to Gerard Manley Hopkins letters in the journal Nature. For example: http://archive.org/stream/nature2918831884lock#page/222/mode/2up

Any of Hopkins' letters, by itself, would be PD and thus meet LibriVox standards for public domain.

I hope this explains why we cannot accept the recording you just sent. I also hope that I have pointed you toward similar material that is in the public domain. If you have any questions, please feel free to post them. We would be delighted to see a reading about the sunsets in a volume of the Nonfiction Collection.

Regards,

Sue (Your book coordinator)
In this 2018 instance, the reader chose not to read Gerard Manley Hopkins' PD description of the Krakatoa volcano sunsets. Since I am fond of Hopkins' poetry, I read Hopkins' letter myself for that volume of the SNF. https://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-057-by-various/

saoussen
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Joined: January 22nd, 2021, 8:58 am

Post by saoussen » April 24th, 2021, 9:38 am

Oh, that's a bummer. I spent the entire night recording it ... i should have paid attention in the beginning. The title of the website was definitely misleading. Anyway, it's okay it can be counted as an experience for me to better my reading skills and i definitely enjoyed reading it.
Thank you sue :D :D

Grothmann
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Joined: March 20th, 2017, 2:44 pm

Post by Grothmann » April 25th, 2021, 10:39 pm

Hi:

A Heroine of the Black Hole
An Unattributed Essay
From Weird Tales, November 1923
Edited by Edwin Baird

Read by Dale Grothmann
Time 3:41

Audio at:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_heroinoftheblackhole_unattributed_dg_128kb.mp3

Text at:
https://archive.org/details/WeirdTalesV02N04192311/page/n25/mode/2up

This is an unusual story. I have included information in the reading which is normally not included, such as the source. This is not a Gutenberg reading, but the date makes it within the Public Domain.

Thanks for your work.
Dale

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » April 26th, 2021, 6:05 am

Grothmann wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 10:39 pm
Hi:

A Heroine of the Black Hole
An Unattributed Essay
From Weird Tales, November 1923
Edited by Edwin Baird

Read by Dale Grothmann
Time 3:41

Audio at:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_heroinoftheblackhole_unattributed_dg_128kb.mp3

Text at:
https://archive.org/details/WeirdTalesV02N04192311/page/n25/mode/2up

This is an unusual story. I have included information in the reading which is normally not included, such as the source. This is not a Gutenberg reading, but the date makes it within the Public Domain.

Thanks for your work.
Dale
Hi Dale,
Thanks for this most unusual contribution to vol. 082! :D It certainly made for some different "breakfast fare" for me along with my morning coffee! There is a Wikipedia article about the prison ship Success. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Success_(prison_ship) It mentions that there was a 1915 silent comedy-documentary "Mabel and Fatty Viewing the World's Fair at San Francisco," which features Roscoe Arbuckle and Mabel Normand getting a tour of the Success. The ship was one of the fair's attractions. The film is available on archive.org., so of course, I looked at it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mabel_and_Fatty_Viewing_the_World%27s_Fair_at_San_Francisco

Well... if you don't want to sit through the entire film, the tour of the Success begins at 9:15. The women's movement would have a field day with this one. After the ship captain shows Roscoe and Mabel the flogging racks, they move on to the Iron Maiden, a life size casket device in the shape of a woman, which closes with spikes which penetrate the body for a slow and agonizing death... Mabel steps inside; Roscoe carelessly leans against the door, which begins to close, almost eviscerating Mabel. She scolds him, and walks off with the (good looking) captain of the ship. Roscoe's response is to reach up and kiss the mouth of the female face of the iron maiden. Whew...

PL OK.

InTheDesert
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Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert » April 27th, 2021, 12:05 am

Freshly catalogued for your listening pleasure:
Christianity and Liberalism
Readers wanted:
Life of John Newton (5 short letters remaining)
Creeds throughout Christian history (22/88 creeds remaining)

Sue Anderson
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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
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Post by Sue Anderson » April 27th, 2021, 4:17 am

Hi InThe Desert, Thanks for adding this second selection by Machen to the LibriVox catalog! :D
You read Machen's address very clearly. There are only two edits that I think are necessary, which I'll give you first.

p. 339, at 4:53 "He is more than one of the sons of men;" You said "He is more than one of the eternal sons of men."

page 345, at 17:05 Text reads: "It was such an one who thought that He was the Son of Man to come on the clouds of heaven." You said "the Son of God"

There are a few other very minor slips. I'm not sure how "word perfect" you intend your recordings to be, so I'll mention them, but you can edit or not, as it pleases you. They do not substantially change the meaning of the text

p. 339, at 4:24 Text: "Jesus of Nazareth was not a product of the world..." You said "this world"

p. 342, at 10:42 first paragraph Text: "...Mark as well as John represents Jesus clearly as a supernatural person." You said "presents Jesus"

page 342, at 11:53 "Text "On the one hand, then, the Jesus of the Gospels is a supernatural person..."
You said "On the other hand..."

msfry
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Post by msfry » May 1st, 2021, 8:01 am

Here is my contribution:

The Great Yorkshire Llama by Charles Dickens

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_greatyorkshirellama_dickens_mtf.mp3 17:50

https://www.djo.org.uk/household-words/volume-vi/page-250.html
Household Words, Volume 6, Page 250-253

This is a story by Dickens describing the mill works of Sir Titus Salt in Yorkshire, England, and his building of Saltaire Village to process alpaca wool into cloth and house over 4000 workers. This story will be linked to from the summary of my current project of Sir Titus Salt's biography, which mentions this story.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 1st, 2021, 11:40 am

msfry wrote:
May 1st, 2021, 8:01 am
Here is my contribution:

The Great Yorkshire Llama by Charles Dickens

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_greatyorkshirellama_dickens_mtf.mp3 17:50

https://www.djo.org.uk/household-words/volume-vi/page-250.html
Household Words, Volume 6, Page 250-253

This is a story by Dickens describing the mill works of Sir Titus Salt in Yorkshire, England, and his building of Saltaire Village to process alpaca wool into cloth and house over 4000 workers. This story will be linked to from the summary of my current project of Sir Titus Salt's biography, which mentions this story.

Hi Michele, Thanks for your contribution to vol. 82! :D You group project Sir Titus Salt viewtopic.php?f=2&t=86892 looks interesting; and I notice there are still some open slots for readers. The model factory town, Saltaire, that Salt founded is, I see, now a Unesco World Heritage Site https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltaire. There's a photo of the handsome mill buildings on Wikipedia.

I had no idea that alpaca was being used for fabric in the 1800's! I had always thought of alpaca wool as an specialty, high end (and expensive!) craft fiber. I discovered just recently that alpaca has entered the mainstream, when I was at JoAnn Fabrics looking for some yarn for an afghan and noticed they had an alpaca-blend yarn in just the color I was looking for. Did I buy it? Yes. So, my crochet project really piqued my interest in Dicken's description of how alpaca wool made Titus Salt's fortune!

Your reading is PL OK.

msfry
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Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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Post by msfry » May 1st, 2021, 12:24 pm

Thanks, Sue. Love your website, a great idea to write about what motivates you. I'll check it out once in awhile, and hope you post some pictures of your crochet projects too.

Feel free to claim some sections on the Salt biography. The chapters are well written (easy to read) and so far all are fascinating.
Michele Fry, CC
“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.” ― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Love Stories #4
Coffee Break #32 - WILDERNESS
Coffee Break #33 - GARDENING

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4378
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 1st, 2021, 2:39 pm

msfry wrote:
May 1st, 2021, 12:24 pm
Thanks, Sue. Love your website, a great idea to write about what motivates you. I'll check it out once in awhile, and hope you post some pictures of your crochet projects too.

Feel free to claim some sections on the Salt biography. The chapters are well written (easy to read) and so far all are fascinating.
One of my afghan's actually does appear (appropriated by my cat), in this post on my website: https://audiobooks.oliveandseablue.com/american-history/veto-of-the-illinois-cat-bill-1949/.

InTheDesert
Posts: 879
Joined: August 20th, 2019, 8:25 pm

Post by InTheDesert » May 2nd, 2021, 7:48 am

Sue Anderson wrote:
April 27th, 2021, 4:17 am

Hi InThe Desert, Thanks for adding this second selection by Machen to the LibriVox catalog! :D
You read Machen's address very clearly. There are only two edits that I think are necessary, which I'll give you first.

p. 339, at 4:53 "He is more than one of the sons of men;" You said "He is more than one of the eternal sons of men."

page 345, at 17:05 Text reads: "It was such an one who thought that He was the Son of Man to come on the clouds of heaven." You said "the Son of God"

There are a few other very minor slips. I'm not sure how "word perfect" you intend your recordings to be, so I'll mention them, but you can edit or not, as it pleases you. They do not substantially change the meaning of the text

p. 339, at 4:24 Text: "Jesus of Nazareth was not a product of the world..." You said "this world"

p. 342, at 10:42 first paragraph Text: "...Mark as well as John represents Jesus clearly as a supernatural person." You said "presents Jesus"

page 342, at 11:53 "Text "On the one hand, then, the Jesus of the Gospels is a supernatural person..."
You said "On the other hand..."
All changes uploaded. Spot checks at 4:24, 4:54, 10:43, 11:56 and 17:08.
Freshly catalogued for your listening pleasure:
Christianity and Liberalism
Readers wanted:
Life of John Newton (5 short letters remaining)
Creeds throughout Christian history (22/88 creeds remaining)

Sue Anderson
Posts: 4378
Joined: July 24th, 2008, 11:48 am
Location: Midwest, USA
Contact:

Post by Sue Anderson » May 2nd, 2021, 8:32 am

InTheDesert wrote:
May 2nd, 2021, 7:48 am

All changes uploaded. Spot checks at 4:24, 4:54, 10:43, 11:56 and 17:08.
Thanks, InTheDesert! I really appreciated the time notations on the spot checks! A great idea.

PL OK. :)

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » May 2nd, 2021, 4:10 pm

Hi Sue. Here's a little sea voyage for you -

Along the Florida Coast
by Dr. J. B. Holder

from The Chautauquan v.7(1886-1887) p. 98-100
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uiug.30112110967715?urlappend=%3Bseq=106

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_alongfloridacoast_holder_jms_128kb.mp3
19:09

Author info:
Joseph Bassett Holder (1824–1888) was an American zoologist and physician.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Bassett_Holder
Jo
My Librivox Solos
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