COMPLETE: Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 082 - jo

Solo or group recordings that are finished and fully available for listeners
Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 2nd, 2021, 6:44 pm

knotyouraveragejo wrote:
May 2nd, 2021, 4:10 pm
Hi Sue. Here's a little sea voyage for you -

Along the Florida Coast
by Dr. J. B. Holder

from The Chautauquan v.7(1886-1887) p. 98-100
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uiug.30112110967715?urlappend=%3Bseq=106

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_alongfloridacoast_holder_jms_128kb.mp3
19:09

Author info:
Joseph Bassett Holder (1824–1888) was an American zoologist and physician.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Bassett_Holder
Hi Jo,
Thanks for this appealing account of sea life along the Florida coasts! :D Holder's colorful descriptions of these creatures certainly holds the reader's (and now the listener's) attention. I found myself turning to the internet to see photos of the leather turtle, sun fish https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/unraveling-the-mysteries-of-the-ocean-sunfish-115258763/) etc. The poor pelicans and laughing gulls seem to have met their match, however, with the frigate bird at the top of their food chain! An enjoyable listen!

:thumbs: PL OK!

Rapunzelina
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Post by Rapunzelina » May 3rd, 2021, 11:52 am

Hi, Sue! This is a pamphlet and I am unsure about its author, so I haven't mentioned any, but I am open to suggestions. It could well be the persons who signed the foreword. Or not. :?

Title of the work: The William Terry Touch Alphabet (for Use By the Deaf and the Deaf-and-Blind)

The link to your file you copied from the uploader: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_touchalphabet_r_128kb.mp3

A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL): https://archive.org/details/williamterrytouc0000haro/mode/2up

Length in minutes: 17:24

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 3rd, 2021, 1:53 pm

Rapunzelina wrote:
May 3rd, 2021, 11:52 am
Hi, Sue! This is a pamphlet and I am unsure about its author, so I haven't mentioned any, but I am open to suggestions. It could well be the persons who signed the foreword. Or not. :?

Title of the work: The William Terry Touch Alphabet (for Use By the Deaf and the Deaf-and-Blind)

The link to your file you copied from the uploader: https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_touchalphabet_r_128kb.mp3

A URL link to the source from which you read (etext URL): https://archive.org/details/williamterrytouc0000haro/mode/2up

Length in minutes: 17:24
Hi Rapunzelina, Thanks for this inspiring story of Dr. William Terry's refusal to give in to the blindness and deafness that threatened to isolate him his friends and family in old age! :D His "white glove" which had the letters of the alphabet marked as pressure points on the hand was most ingenious.

I think we can safely say that Harold T. Clark is the author of the pamphlet. Archive.org cites Clark as the author. Also, the typewritten letter written by Clark to the New York Circulating Library for the Blind, which is included in the edition, states that Dr. William Terry was his grandfather. Clark then goes on to say "This system proved of such incalculable value in Dr. Terry's case, that I am seeking to spread a knowledge thereof in the hope that it may benefit others."

Jo can edit the file name to reflect Clark's authorship, so you don't have to do anything on your end.

Your reading is PL OK! :)

TadDavis
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Joined: February 6th, 2012, 5:18 pm

Post by TadDavis » May 4th, 2021, 8:47 am

Hi - first time out in the Short Nonfiction category, although I've done a handful of chapters elsewhere. I'm proposing to do two essays from The Rambler by Samuel Johnson. Hope I've got all the necessary information below.

The first is from The Rambler Number 148, an (untitled) essay on parental tyranny.

The file is here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_rambler148_johnson_td_128kb.mp3

The length: 11m 44s.

The text is here:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11397
(Unfortunately no navigable table of contents, but a search for "148" will get you there. I didn't attempt to read the Greek or Latin, only the translated portions.)

The other essay I'd like to do is The Rambler Number 207, which is an essay about how energy tends to flag toward the end of a great undertaking, and how important it is to keep plugging away.

Sue Anderson
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Location: Midwest, USA
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 4th, 2021, 2:50 pm

TadDavis wrote:
May 4th, 2021, 8:47 am
Hi - first time out in the Short Nonfiction category, although I've done a handful of chapters elsewhere. I'm proposing to do two essays from The Rambler by Samuel Johnson. Hope I've got all the necessary information below.

The first is from The Rambler Number 148, an (untitled) essay on parental tyranny.

The file is here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_rambler148_johnson_td_128kb.mp3

The length: 11m 44s.

The text is here:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11397
(Unfortunately no navigable table of contents, but a search for "148" will get you there. I didn't attempt to read the Greek or Latin, only the translated portions.)

The other essay I'd like to do is The Rambler Number 207, which is an essay about how energy tends to flag toward the end of a great undertaking, and how important it is to keep plugging away.
Hi Tad, Welcome to the Short Nonfiction Collection! :D Samuel Johnson is always a good choice for an invigorating read! Johnson's thoughts in this essay, it seemed to me, comes into clear focus when he says "To have voluntarily become to any being the occasion of its existence, produces an obligation to make that existence happy." But parents do not always abide by their parental "obligation," as Johnson goes on to detail in his essay.

I am marking your recording "PL OK" in the Magic Window. I noted only one small deviation from the text, but it did not, in my opinion, change the meaning of the text. This occurred in your reading of the ode from Horace, with which Johnson starts #148. In the English translation, the last line read reads "In kind compassion sav'd my husband's life." You read this as "spared my husbands life."

In order for me, as proof listener, to sort out whether "spared" was an ok substitution for "saved," I was led down various paths of discovery--the Odes of Horace, the two feuding brothers in the myth of the Danaides http://madelinemiller.com/myth-of-the-week-the-danaids/, and finally to a modern translation of Horace
https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/HoraceOdesBkIII.php#anchor_Toc40263856.

I found out that the daughter in the myth has been ordered by her father to kill her husband on her wedding night. Instead of obeying her father, she tells her betrothed to flee from her father, thus both sparing and saving her husband's life.

Thank you for your first contribution to vol. 082. We're looking forward to your second reading from the Rambler!

TadDavis
Posts: 67
Joined: February 6th, 2012, 5:18 pm

Post by TadDavis » May 4th, 2021, 2:59 pm

Sue Anderson wrote:
May 4th, 2021, 2:50 pm
TadDavis wrote:
May 4th, 2021, 8:47 am
Hi - first time out in the Short Nonfiction category, although I've done a handful of chapters elsewhere. I'm proposing to do two essays from The Rambler by Samuel Johnson. Hope I've got all the necessary information below.

The first is from The Rambler Number 148, an (untitled) essay on parental tyranny.

The file is here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_rambler148_johnson_td_128kb.mp3

The length: 11m 44s.

The text is here:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11397
(Unfortunately no navigable table of contents, but a search for "148" will get you there. I didn't attempt to read the Greek or Latin, only the translated portions.)

The other essay I'd like to do is The Rambler Number 207, which is an essay about how energy tends to flag toward the end of a great undertaking, and how important it is to keep plugging away.
Hi Tad, Welcome to the Short Nonfiction Collection! :D Samuel Johnson is always a good choice for an invigorating read! Johnson's thoughts in this essay, it seemed to me, comes into clear focus when he says "To have voluntarily become to any being the occasion of its existence, produces an obligation to make that existence happy." But parents do not always abide by their parental "obligation," as Johnson goes on to detail in his essay.

I am marking your recording "PL OK" in the Magic Window. I noted only one small deviation from the text, but it did not, in my opinion, change the meaning of the text. This occurred in your reading of the ode from Horace, with which Johnson starts #148. In the English translation, the last line read reads "In kind compassion sav'd my husband's life." You read this as "spared my husbands life."

In order for me, as proof listener, to sort out whether "spared" was an ok substitution for "saved," I was led down various paths of discovery--the Odes of Horace, the two feuding brothers in the myth of the Danaides http://madelinemiller.com/myth-of-the-week-the-danaids/, and finally to a modern translation of Horace
https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/HoraceOdesBkIII.php#anchor_Toc40263856.

I found out that the daughter in the myth has been ordered by her father to kill her husband on her wedding night. Instead of obeying her father, she tells her betrothed to flee from her father, thus both sparing and saving her husband's life.

Thank you for your first contribution to vol. 082. We're looking forward to your second reading from the Rambler!
Wow. I appreciate your going to all that extra trouble to scope out my misreading. I’d still be willing to correct it if you prefer!

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 4th, 2021, 4:17 pm

It's just fine as is, Tad! :)

pwitt
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Post by pwitt » May 4th, 2021, 9:40 pm

From Modern Essays, at the following site
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38280/38280-0.txt

I here by submit "The Man-O'War's 'Er 'Usband" by David W Bone uploaded as follows:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_manowar_bone_pw_128kb.mp3

Which runs about 19 minutes and 38 seconds

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 5th, 2021, 6:02 am

pwitt wrote:
May 4th, 2021, 9:40 pm
From Modern Essays, at the following site
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38280/38280-0.txt

I here by submit "The Man-O'War's 'Er 'Usband" by David W Bone uploaded as follows:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_manowar_bone_pw_128kb.mp3

Which runs about 19 minutes and 38 seconds
Hi PWitt, Welcome back to the SNF with this tale of heroism at sea! :D The expression with which you read Captain Bone's account of the sinking of the Cameronia was very moving! Very well done! :D

PL OK. :thumbs:

Availle
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Post by Availle » May 5th, 2021, 7:52 pm

Here is my contribution, a short biography of Elizabeth Blackwell, 9:29: :D

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_elizabethblackwell_unknown_ava_128kb.mp3

Author: unknown? I'm not sure since it's from an anthology called "Woman of the Century" from 1893 with several editors:
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Woman_of_the_Century

The article on her is here (her sister's on the next page):
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Woman_of_the_Century/Elizabeth_Blackwell

We don't usually accept wikisource, but if you click on the links to the left of the page you'll get a scan of the original book.
Cheers, Ava.
Resident witch of LibriVox. "I ain't Nice."

--
AvailleAudio.com

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 6th, 2021, 8:21 am

Availle wrote:
May 5th, 2021, 7:52 pm
Here is my contribution, a short biography of Elizabeth Blackwell, 9:29: :D

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_elizabethblackwell_unknown_ava_128kb.mp3

Author: unknown? I'm not sure since it's from an anthology called "Woman of the Century" from 1893 with several editors:
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Woman_of_the_Century

The article on her is here (her sister's on the next page):
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Woman_of_the_Century/Elizabeth_Blackwell

We don't usually accept wikisource, but if you click on the links to the left of the page you'll get a scan of the original book.
https://archive.org/details/cu31924032324752/page/n101/mode/1up

Hi Availle, Thank you for this informative biography of a pioneering physician, Elizabeth Blackwell! :D

There is only one small edit that needs to be made: at 4:33.5, the original text reads "In the autumn of 1851 she opened an office in New York City." You said "in the autumn of 1881."

Your unintentional misread points up one of the reasons that the SNF does not recommend using Wikisource for readings. Wikisource has the date wrong -- as 1881.

The Blackwell family members were certainly strong willed and enterprising. I was interested enough after listening to your recording to go on to read the bio of Elizabeth's younger sister, Emily (1826-1910). What struck me about her career was the fact that the singular achievements of pioneering activists do not always lead to lasting reform:

From Emily's bio: "Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell had graduated at the Geneva Medical College in 1849... When her sister Emily, in 1851, applied for admission, she was met with the discouraging declaration that they were not ready to look upon the case of Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell as a precedent, and the admission, training and graduation of one woman did not mean the permanent opening of the doors of the Geneva Medical College to women."


pwitt
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Joined: November 7th, 2020, 7:22 pm

Post by pwitt » May 6th, 2021, 8:39 am

Sue Anderson wrote:
May 5th, 2021, 6:02 am
pwitt wrote:
May 4th, 2021, 9:40 pm
From Modern Essays, at the following site
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/38280/38280-0.txt

I here by submit "The Man-O'War's 'Er 'Usband" by David W Bone uploaded as follows:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_manowar_bone_pw_128kb.mp3

Which runs about 19 minutes and 38 seconds
Hi PWitt, Welcome back to the SNF with this tale of heroism at sea! :D The expression with which you read Captain Bone's account of the sinking of the Cameronia was very moving! Very well done! :D

PL OK. :thumbs:
Thanks, I was feeling a little inadequate to the task.

TadDavis
Posts: 67
Joined: February 6th, 2012, 5:18 pm

Post by TadDavis » May 7th, 2021, 6:53 am

Here's my second proposed Samuel Johnson essay, the Rambler No. 207, about seeing projects through (although as is often the case, that bare summary really doesn't do justice to the ground Johnson covers). Some editions have given titles to the essays, but the titles aren't in the public domain.

The file is here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_rambler207_johnson_td_128kb.mp3

The length: 11m 53.

The text is here:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11397

I love Johnson's essays. These are only a couple from a list of 15-20 I'd love to do eventually, should the opportunity arise.

Piotrek81
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Post by Piotrek81 » May 7th, 2021, 10:40 am

Here's my contribution:

https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_ancientworld_jacobs_pn81_128kb.mp3 24:00

THE WORLD AS KNOWN TO THE ANCIENTS chapter 1 of How the world became known, by Joseph Jacobs

If you read along, you'll notice that at one point there is an incomplete sentence (or at least so it seems to me). Towards the end, there's also a repeated sentence so I decided to skip one iteration.
Want to hear some PREPARATION TIPS before you press "record"? Listen to THIS and THIS

Sue Anderson
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Post by Sue Anderson » May 7th, 2021, 11:07 am

TadDavis wrote:
May 7th, 2021, 6:53 am
Here's my second proposed Samuel Johnson essay, the Rambler No. 207, about seeing projects through (although as is often the case, that bare summary really doesn't do justice to the ground Johnson covers). Some editions have given titles to the essays, but the titles aren't in the public domain.

The file is here:
https://librivox.org/uploads/knotyouraveragejo/snf082_rambler207_johnson_td_128kb.mp3

The length: 11m 53.

The text is here:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11397

I love Johnson's essays. These are only a couple from a list of 15-20 I'd love to do eventually, should the opportunity arise.
Tad, Thanks for this 2nd contribution from The Rambler. The Gutenberg edition of The Rambler has titles for all the essays. They are grouped together in a long paragraph after the capitalized VOLUME THE THIRD. I've added the names Gutenberg lists to the titles of your selections in the Magic Window. Does that look better to you?

Lots of pithy insights in Johnson's #207! :) Here's one that grabbed my attention: "... so frequent is the necessity of resting below that perfection which we imagined within our reach, that seldom any man obtains more from his endeavours than a painful conviction of his defects, and a continual resuscitation of desires which he feels himself unable to gratify."

PL OK. :thumbs:
Last edited by Sue Anderson on May 7th, 2021, 2:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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