Translations and copyright

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RuthieG
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Post by RuthieG » September 9th, 2009, 2:08 pm

Beware, though. Not everything on Wikisource is in the Public Domain. Many have Creative Commons licences of varying sorts, which are not the same as Public Domain. I don't even understand enough Spanish to tell which licence is which. ;)

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macandal
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Post by macandal » September 9th, 2009, 2:13 pm

Cori wrote:It's always the problem of finding the texts online, or in a local-ish library (probably a University library rather than town libraries, though sometimes they surprise you.) I'd recommend finding some online book sources IN Spanish, and then browse to see what's available within them. (Is this Cervantes exclusively, for instance?) It's possible to look up various titles - for example, there's definitely some public domain Jane Austen in Spanish and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde has an 1891/1921 translation somewhere. There's also Veinte mil leguas de viaje submarino (1869). But none of that tells you how to track down actual copies (or reprints) of those texts.

There are some modern Verne translations here, and I s'pose it might be possible to contact the translator to see if any are in the public domain (the ones I clicked on claimed a copyright.)
Thanks Cori for these resources. No, Cervantes Virtual is not Cervantes-exclusive. Wow, I just found there (CV) a translation of Count of Montecristo dating back to 1856!! Now, allow me to be picky, the problem with such old translations is that, well, languages evolve and so the Spanish they use is somewhat antiquated, you can imagine. At least is better than nothing. I like the version in Wikisource Spanish. That one appears to be more modern. The problem is that they don't list the source, but, if it is in Wikisource it's good to go, right?

macandal
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Post by macandal » September 9th, 2009, 2:19 pm

macandal wrote:I like the version in Wikisource Spanish. That one appears to be more modern. The problem is that they don't list the source, but, if it is in Wikisource it's good to go, right?
RuthieG wrote:Beware, though. Not everything on Wikisource is in the Public Domain. Many have Creative Commons licences of varying sorts, which are not the same as Public Domain. I don't even understand enough Spanish to tell which licence is which. Wink
Okay Ruthie, you answered my question. This is the CC license The Count of Montecristo is under.

Cori
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Post by Cori » September 9th, 2009, 2:24 pm

The only CC licence that will work for us is along the lines of: http://creativecommons.org/about/cc0
There's honestly no such thing as a stupid question -- but I'm afraid I can't rule out giving a stupid answer : : To Posterity and Beyond!

chocoholic
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Post by chocoholic » September 9th, 2009, 2:24 pm

I'm afraid the Count on Wikisource would not be OK, then. That's too bad.

As far as the archaic language of the older works, heh heh -- we run into the exact same problem in English. :D
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macandal
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Post by macandal » September 9th, 2009, 2:30 pm

Cori wrote:The only CC licence that will work for us is along the lines of: http://creativecommons.org/about/cc0
If only wikisource listed the source document. Why don't they do that? If I could go to the source document I could see what the actual rights are.

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Post by chocoholic » September 9th, 2009, 2:33 pm

macandal wrote:If I could go to the source document I could see what the actual rights are.
Does it list a publication date for the translation? If it's 1923 or later, it is very unlikely to be in the US public domain.
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macandal
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Post by macandal » September 9th, 2009, 2:46 pm

chocoholic wrote:Does it list a publication date for the translation? If it's 1923 or later, it is very unlikely to be in the US public domain.
Nothing. Check this out. I don't see anything there. You'd think wikisource would require something to acknowledge the "creator" of the work?

Musicmeister
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Post by Musicmeister » September 10th, 2009, 12:44 am

A good example of a work that is in the Public Domain but the translations for the most part are NOT in the public domain?

Art of War by Sun Tzu.

The original work is WELL into the public domain since it was published originally in about 6BC, but most translations are modern works - and carry a modern copyright. FYI - The first English translation of the work was in 1905.

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