How to amplify without distorting the audio

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ej400
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Post by ej400 » February 28th, 2021, 4:01 pm

I'm planning to record a lot more lately, but my editing skills may have suffered a bit. Sometimes when I record my voice hasn't "warmed up" yet, and I'm quiet. Of course, a good editor will amplify the quieter area, but for some reason whenever I do only that section I want to turn up, I can hear the audio becomes just ever so slightly distorted. It's nothing much or that would cause PL notes, but would it just help to move the mic closer during recording?

knotyouraveragejo
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Post by knotyouraveragejo » February 28th, 2021, 9:17 pm

That depends on how close to the mic you are to start with. :) It's always best to try and stay at approximately the same distance from the microphone for the whole recording. When you amplify the quieter section, you are also amplifying any background noise for that section so it is more noticeable than in the other sections. Try doing whatever noise removal you generally do first and then amplify the quieter sections and see if that helps.

If the problem is just that you need to "warm up" your voice, you could also just read a couple of random paragraphs or try some warmup voice exercises like singers use until you settle into your normal volume range and then start the actual recording.
Jo
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Availle
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Post by Availle » March 1st, 2021, 12:20 am

In the first narrator workshop by Mark he offered this tip for a good distance to the mic:

Spread out your fingers. The tip of your pinky should just tough the microphone, the tip of your thumb just touch your mouth.

This is best to read quietly and expressively without straining the voice too much.
Mic gain is important too though. :wink:
And as jo says, warming up is always a good idea.
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ej400
Posts: 2867
Joined: September 24th, 2014, 10:26 am
Location: Minnesota

Post by ej400 » March 1st, 2021, 2:33 pm

knotyouraveragejo wrote:
February 28th, 2021, 9:17 pm
That depends on how close to the mic you are to start with. :) It's always best to try and stay at approximately the same distance from the microphone for the whole recording. When you amplify the quieter section, you are also amplifying any background noise for that section so it is more noticeable than in the other sections. Try doing whatever noise removal you generally do first and then amplify the quieter sections and see if that helps.

If the problem is just that you need to "warm up" your voice, you could also just read a couple of random paragraphs or try some warmup voice exercises like singers use until you settle into your normal volume range and then start the actual recording.
That's what I was thinking. Possibly the background noise get's louder with it. I've had problems with background noise in the past. But also my social distancing to the mic isn't always 6 inches :lol:

ej400
Posts: 2867
Joined: September 24th, 2014, 10:26 am
Location: Minnesota

Post by ej400 » March 1st, 2021, 2:33 pm

Availle wrote:
March 1st, 2021, 12:20 am
In the first narrator workshop by Mark he offered this tip for a good distance to the mic:

Spread out your fingers. The tip of your pinky should just tough the microphone, the tip of your thumb just touch your mouth.

This is best to read quietly and expressively without straining the voice too much.
Mic gain is important too though. :wink:
And as jo says, warming up is always a good idea.
Thank you for the tip! I'll have to check out that workshop too, just haven't got there yet :wink:

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