Three New Genres (2 in Children's Nonfiction)

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TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » February 28th, 2021, 7:30 am

There are two new Children's Nonfiction sub-genres: Biography and History. If you're launching a project that is nonfiction, geared towards children/youth, and that is telling someone's real life story or some history, use these genres, please. :)

We have also added an Asian Antiquity genre for really old Asian literature. Right now it's a sub-genre under "Classics (Greek and Latin)" but that might change. (Since we cannot rearrange the order of the genre lists, this is the best place we could think of it for now.)
Bulwer-Lytton novel: The Caxtons
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KevinS
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Post by KevinS » February 28th, 2021, 7:37 am

Asian is a pretty amorphous term. I'm very happy to see the issue addressed, though.

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » February 28th, 2021, 8:22 am

Is there a list of genres somewhere?

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

mightyfelix
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Post by mightyfelix » February 28th, 2021, 8:41 am

If you go to the search page, you can browse by genre, and there is a list to choose from: https://librivox.org/search?primary_key=0&search_category=genre&search_page=1&search_form=get_results

Peter Why
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Post by Peter Why » February 28th, 2021, 11:58 am

Thanks; it's interesting to see how we've divided our subjects.

Peter
"I think, therefore I am, I think." Solomon Cohen, in Terry Pratchett's Dodger

TriciaG
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Post by TriciaG » February 28th, 2021, 4:21 pm

KevinS wrote:
February 28th, 2021, 7:37 am
Asian is a pretty amorphous term. I'm very happy to see the issue addressed, though.
Yes, I know. But what is a succinct term that we can use for Indian/Chinese/Japanese or other East Asian ancient lit? :hmm:
Bulwer-Lytton novel: The Caxtons
Boring works 30-70 minutes long: Insomnia Collection 5
Psychological Warfare: HERE
Thrift, by Samuel Smiles HERE

KevinS
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Post by KevinS » February 28th, 2021, 4:53 pm

TriciaG wrote:
February 28th, 2021, 4:21 pm
KevinS wrote:
February 28th, 2021, 7:37 am
Asian is a pretty amorphous term. I'm very happy to see the issue addressed, though.
Yes, I know. But what is a succinct term that we can use for Indian/Chinese/Japanese or other East Asian ancient lit? :hmm:
Yes, I know, though I wonder about the Semitic languages, such as Hebrew and Arabic. I just don't think of them as especially Asian. Of course, defining Asian and all its arguments speaks to this.

ColleenMc
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Post by ColleenMc » March 2nd, 2021, 9:27 am

True, Near East and Far East (or Asian) is usually the dividing line but those are old designations and pretty Eurocentric (East from where?). I always found it weird when I was in law enforcement and entering someone's physical description info in a report that someone from Israel or the Middle East was classified as Asian. More Eurocentrism--"ancient literature" in the generic sense usually means ancient Greek/Roman/Middle Eastern civilizations and people don't think of Asian let alone the literature and oral traditions of the various indigenous people worldwide. One of those colonialist categorizations that you don't really question when you are growing up and learning categories of this and that (especially if you are a library-haunting nerd like me) that you have to consciously learn to ask, wait, why is this? at some point. I'm embarrassed how late in life such insights have come to me (and are still coming...)

Colleen
Colleen McMahon

No matter where you go, there you are. -- Buckaroo Banzai

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