Authors Then & Now

Everything except LibriVox (yes, this is where knitting gets discussed. Now includes non-LV Volunteers Wanted projects)
lurcherlover
Posts: 771
Joined: November 10th, 2016, 3:54 am
Location: LONDON UK

Post by lurcherlover » May 31st, 2019, 2:05 pm

lymiewithpurpose wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:48 pm
lurcherlover wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:37 pm
As far as scripts go for films and particularly TV, I've found that in the last ten or twenty years that the standards are appallingly low. Writers who have no idea about plot structure, how to characterise, or how to just write in good English. (Foreign languages I can't comment on, but I bet that French and Italian scripts just to name two, are a lot better). I often wonder what planet some of these English scriptwriters come from!
Interesting that you discuss plot structure. I am going to take the opposing side and say that I much prefer the plots of modern day novels. They may not have all the components or in perfect order, but they keep me engaged. 99% of older books bore me to death, so I choose what I read carefully. I know when I am assigned a book in school I look at the publication date, if I see it's decently old I automatically have a prejudice against it. And oftentimes I feel like poor English is intentional. The vast majority of people in the real world do not speak in formal and proper language all the time, and this accurately represents our current setting. Again, this is a youngster's opinion though.
I probably did not make this clear, my fault, but I did not mean that colloquial language should not be used, and obviously, also dialects. The only problem is that in the UK dialects can mean that it is difficult to understand - for example, I find the Scottish dialect very hard (sometimes) to understand, even though I did once live there for nearly three years. Dialogue should not in any case sound like perfect English, but as normal people sound.

The book I'm recording at the moment has lots of colloquial language, broken English, as well as Russian words, and also Dukes and Duchesses speaking perfect English (even though they are Russian aristocracy) as well as peasants using peasant phrases. This is an example of a book written in about 1921 and probably for you qualifies as boring, but the plot structure is pretty good and it's anything but boring - at least in my opinion. It has awful people, revolutionary's, murderers, class warfare, and the old Russian Revolution, as well as a romantic hero and heroin.

But yes, just like today's writers, the writers of the past are a mixture of good and bad, boring and incompetent, as well as brilliant.

lymiewithpurpose
Posts: 1811
Joined: January 18th, 2019, 6:26 pm
Location: California

Post by lymiewithpurpose » May 31st, 2019, 2:10 pm

lurcherlover wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 2:05 pm
lymiewithpurpose wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:48 pm
lurcherlover wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:37 pm
As far as scripts go for films and particularly TV, I've found that in the last ten or twenty years that the standards are appallingly low. Writers who have no idea about plot structure, how to characterise, or how to just write in good English. (Foreign languages I can't comment on, but I bet that French and Italian scripts just to name two, are a lot better). I often wonder what planet some of these English scriptwriters come from!
Interesting that you discuss plot structure. I am going to take the opposing side and say that I much prefer the plots of modern day novels. They may not have all the components or in perfect order, but they keep me engaged. 99% of older books bore me to death, so I choose what I read carefully. I know when I am assigned a book in school I look at the publication date, if I see it's decently old I automatically have a prejudice against it. And oftentimes I feel like poor English is intentional. The vast majority of people in the real world do not speak in formal and proper language all the time, and this accurately represents our current setting. Again, this is a youngster's opinion though.
I probably did not make this clear, my fault, but I did not mean that colloquial language should not be used, and obviously, also dialects. The only problem is that in the UK dialects can mean that it is difficult to understand - for example, I find the Scottish dialect very hard (sometimes) to understand, even though I did once live there for nearly three years. Dialogue should not in any case sound like perfect English, but as normal people sound.

The book I'm recording at the moment has lots of colloquial language, broken English, as well as Russian words, and also Dukes and Duchesses speaking perfect English (even though they are Russian aristocracy) as well as peasants using peasant phrases. This is an example of a book written in about 1921 and probably for you qualifies as boring, but the plot structure is pretty good and it's anything but boring - at least in my opinion. It has awful people, revolutionary's, murderers, class warfare, and the old Russian Revolution, as well as a romantic hero and heroin.

But yes, just like today's writers, the writers of the past are a mixture of good and bad, boring and incompetent, as well as brilliant.
Thanks for clarifying. That makes much more sense. I guess it's a tricky business all the way around.

As for your interesting book, that sounds pretty cool to me. There are always exceptions and books that I find extremely entertaining (I mean why else would I be recording here), just for the most part I find them boring. Interesting discussion!
Campbell
Constructive criticism always welcome

Readers wanted: The Cliff-Dwellers

ej400
Posts: 2180
Joined: September 24th, 2014, 10:26 am
Location: Minnesota

Post by ej400 » May 31st, 2019, 2:36 pm

lymiewithpurpose wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:48 pm
Interesting that you discuss plot structure. I am going to take the opposing side and say that I much prefer the plots of modern day novels. They may not have all the components or in perfect order, but they keep me engaged. 99% of older books bore me to death, so I choose what I read carefully. I know when I am assigned a book in school I look at the publication date, if I see it's decently old I automatically have a prejudice against it. And oftentimes I feel like poor English is intentional. The vast majority of people in the real world do not speak in formal and proper language all the time, and this accurately represents our current setting. Again, this is a youngster's opinion though.
I'm a youngster too, and I prefer a lot of older things (including older music sometimes). But as for books, I usually only look for older authors, just because I know what to expect. Nowadays, I can look at the title and go "hmm, this one sounds good", but then read the first chapter and I can predict the end. Yes, I do think there are some good new authors out there (like me :lol: <laughing>), but a high majority of them just aren't great. I guess too, I prefer older books too because I grew up with them. But again, it depends on what genre your reading. I like classics, and there's a lot of them from 1800 to 1950.

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