New Words Learned from Librivox

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SonOfTheExiles
Posts: 2425
Joined: December 20th, 2013, 1:14 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by SonOfTheExiles » February 24th, 2021, 7:23 pm

Just found a transitive verb I'd never heard before ... "thole" ... though I gather some from Up North might be familiar with it. I had a vague notion of its noun form ... an oar-pivot pin ... but not as a verb.

It's in a book by an Australian poetess that I'm reviewing for a future Australian Poetry Project ... I always read them cover-to-cover first before launch ... and I must admit, it stumped me.

Here is the definition: Verb ( transitive) 1. to put up with; bear. 2. an archaic word for suffer.

"Do you think that you could thole it, Australian born and free,
Where the call of many rivers finds an echo in the sea?
Do you think that you could bear to feel the chain that girds you round?
'Midst the chitter of the bell-birds in your happy hunting ground..."



Cheers,
Chris
"Sorry, my tongue got in the way of my eye-tooth, and I couldn't see what I was saying..."

Come and assist Doctor Pangloss instruct the Baron in the proper use of his conjugals and declensions in our new play "The Heir At Law"

realisticspeakers
Posts: 1812
Joined: December 6th, 2010, 5:15 pm

Post by realisticspeakers » February 24th, 2021, 9:49 pm

SonOfTheExiles wrote:
February 24th, 2021, 7:23 pm
Just found a transitive verb I'd never heard before ... "thole" ... though I gather some from Up North might be familiar with it. I had a vague notion of its noun form ... an oar-pivot pin ... but not as a verb.

It's in a book by an Australian poetess that I'm reviewing for a future Australian Poetry Project ... I always read them cover-to-cover first before launch ... and I must admit, it stumped me.

Here is the definition: Verb ( transitive) 1. to put up with; bear. 2. an archaic word for suffer.


Cheers,
Chris
The first noble truth: There is thole.
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

anneflebari
Posts: 337
Joined: January 24th, 2017, 1:54 pm

Post by anneflebari » February 25th, 2021, 4:31 am

As an emigrant from "up North" I immediately thought of that well-known phrase ," put wood in 'thole"..ie Shut the door"! 😃 Anne

realisticspeakers
Posts: 1812
Joined: December 6th, 2010, 5:15 pm

Post by realisticspeakers » March 1st, 2021, 1:32 am

I'm 59 years old. I've been with Librivox 10 years.
I majored in Linguistics for crying out loud, and this morning I just learned of the word prolixity.
Imagine my chagrin. :chagrin emoji:

https://www.etymonline.com/word/prolix
etymologically "poured out," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + base of liquere "to flow" (see liquid (adj.)).

Of persons, "long-winded, prone to indulge in lengthy discourse," 1520s.
Truth exists for the wise, Beauty for a feeling heart: They belong to each other. - Beethoven
Disclaimer:
"Kind reader, if this our performance doth in aught fall short of promise, blame not our good intent, but our unperfect wit."

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