Non-Public-Domain Audiobooks

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LailaBalke
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Post by LailaBalke » May 23rd, 2007, 3:42 am

Hi there!

I was just wondering what professional (is that terminology acceptable and politically correct? *lol*) voice-talents you look up to and admire.
Or also which audiobooks you recommend in terms of how they are read.

As for me - it would be George Orwell's 1984 read by Frank Muller. His voice is so creamy and rich and masculine. And he has a nice flowing style that makes you just want to close your eyes do nothin other than listen for hours on end. Very pleasant! Also he doesn't fall apart when miming female voices and many male voice artist tend to.

Then as a german, it's almost impossible to like audio books without knowing the name Rufus Beck. He read among others JK Rowling and Eoin Colfer etc. - and for me he's just amazing as well. He makes me like listening to my own language - something that (oddly enough) I seldom feel.

So what about you guys?

x Laila

Cloud Mountain
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Post by Cloud Mountain » May 23rd, 2007, 5:01 am

In English, George Guidel, hands down. Scott Cambell is also good.
As for wimmins, Donata Peters (even though she has a British accent.)

Frank Muller IS excellent.
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kayray
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Post by kayray » May 23rd, 2007, 9:00 am

Ahhh... Frank Muller -- borrowed his Great Gatsby from the library and fell in love.

John McDonough, George Guidell, Sally Darling (her To Kill A Mockingbird can't be beat) and Flo Gibson.
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Jc
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Post by Jc » May 23rd, 2007, 9:59 am

Stephen Fry all the way!! I don't know much about other audiobooks, though...

jimmowatt
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Post by jimmowatt » May 23rd, 2007, 11:19 am

Steven Fry for me too especially when reading his own books.
There's a recording of 'The Liar' which has wonderful energy
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Post by ExEmGe » May 23rd, 2007, 11:56 am

Patrick Malahide is the best I've heard - but he has done very few, most notably 'Five Red Herrings' by Dorothy L Sayers. In it there is a caae conference with Wimsey and about five Scots policemen - and he does it perfectly, each with a slightly different accent. A real tour de force.
Failing him, Nigel Anthony is very good and of course Martin Jarvis is 'the old reliable' I've never heard him do a bad job.
The pure voice I like best though is Alan Bennett - particularly reading Winnie the Pooh
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LailaBalke
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Post by LailaBalke » May 23rd, 2007, 3:02 pm

Steven Fry makes me think of Sean Bean! He reads sooo nice with his Sheffield accent! Don't ask about the association though...

Fedarion
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Post by Fedarion » May 23rd, 2007, 6:26 pm

ExEmGe wrote: The pure voice I like best though is Alan Bennett - particularly reading Winnie the Pooh
Winnie the Pooh will always be Sterling Holloway. :)

kayray
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Post by kayray » May 23rd, 2007, 6:33 pm

Fedarion wrote: Winnie the Pooh will always be Sterling Holloway. :)
I had lots of Disney Winnie the Pooh LPs when I was little -- still have 'em, actually :) I can sing all the songs...
Oh the rain rain rain came down down down, in rushing roaring riv'lets
And the river crept out of its bed, and crept right into Piglet's!

Charles Kurault (SP?) reads Pooh very well, too.
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Rainbow
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Post by Rainbow » May 23rd, 2007, 7:45 pm

Jc wrote:Stephen Fry all the way!! I don't know much about other audiobooks, though...
Absolutely!! I've just finished listening to all of the Harry Potter books in preparation for the last one, and he's very good.

LeonMire
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Post by LeonMire » May 23rd, 2007, 11:09 pm

I was absolutely taken in by the reading of Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar by Maggie Gyllenhaal. I couldn't help smiling throughout the whole first part of it, because her voice is so creamy and deliciously ironic. But as I got further in the novel, I was constantly on the verge of tears, because this beautiful, melodic voice I had fallen in love with had become bleak, shattered, hopeless. Definitely the best audiobook I've ever listened to, at least in terms of performance.

Also, I have to give Maggie Gyllenhaal props because, in the story, the protagonist reads from James Joyce's novel Finnegan's Wake, which, as you may know, is an absolutely incomprehensible work. Every sentence is filled with incredibly obscure allusions, multilingual puns, and words Joyce just made up, sometimes as long as 100 letters. Maggie had to read the first page of that novel, because the character is writing a dissertation on it, and the page included this sentence:

"The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy."

I'm sure she had to repeat that sentence 100 times before she got it right.
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kristin
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Post by kristin » May 23rd, 2007, 11:17 pm

Have the Stephen Fry fans seen this: http://voco.uk.com/

I want one.
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Post by Rowen » May 24th, 2007, 2:37 am

kristin wrote:Have the Stephen Fry fans seen this: http://voco.uk.com/

I want one.
Wow. That is awesome! :)
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kayray
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Post by kayray » May 24th, 2007, 9:34 am

You can download the mp3s (10 for free, or the whole set for something like $15)! I've been planning to get Henry set up with a nice "good morning sir" playlist in his iPod (he's a HUGE Jeeves and Wooster fan).

And of course there are the 10 Good Morning Madam mp3s that are already in my laptop -- just need to install that auto-play program for iTunes :)
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LailaBalke
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Post by LailaBalke » May 24th, 2007, 9:58 am

LeonMire wrote:I was absolutely taken in by the reading of Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar by Maggie Gyllenhaal. I couldn't help smiling throughout the whole first part of it, because her voice is so creamy and deliciously ironic.
Now that's what I'm talking about! Awesome, I absolutely want to buy that now :)
Maggie Gyllenhaal is an amazing actress and I'd love to see how she tackles a difficult book like that.

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