COMPLETE[Play]You Never Can Tell by George Bernard Shaw - thw

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ktaylor07
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 6:00 am

You Never Can Tell, by George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)
In this witty comedy of errors, the Clandon siblings, Gloria and the twins, Dolly and Philip attempt to uncover the identity of their long lost father. Playwright George Bernard Shaw uses the odd mix of eccentric characters thrown together in a seaside setting to make a number of sharp observations about marriage, romance, and parenthood. (Summary by Kelly S. Taylor)
This project is complete. Audio files can be found on our catalog page at https://librivox.org/you-never-can-tell-by-george-bernard-shaw/

Source text (please read only from this text!): https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2175

Deadline: Please submit your recording within 2 months of placing your claim. If you cannot complete the recording within this time, please post in the thread to relinquish your claim or to ask the BC for an extension. If your recording is not completed by the deadline, your claim may be reassigned at the BC's discretion.

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Magic Window:



BC Admin
========================================
This paragraph is temporary and will be replaced by the MC with the list of sections and reader (Magic Window) once this project is in the admin system.
  • Project Code: DiCeE7Qj
  • Link to author on Wikipedia (if available): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Bernard_Shaw (George Bernard Shaw)
  • Link to title on Wikipedia (if available): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Never_Can_Tell_(play)
  • Number of sections (files) this project will have: 35
  • Does the project have an introduction or preface: No
  • Original publication date (if known): 1897
  • If you are a new volunteer, how would you like your name (or pseudonym) credited in the catalog?
  • Do you have a URL you would like associated with your name?:
========================================

Genres for the project: Plays/Comedy/Satire

Keywords that describe the book: farce, social satire, comedy of manners

========================================

LibriVox recording settings: mono (1 channel), 44100 Hz sample rate, 128 kbps constant bit rate MP3. See the Tech Specs

For individual roles:
Submit one file per act. At the beginning of the first file, say:
"Character, read by your name."
Leave 3-5 seconds of space between your lines (room noise, not generated silence).

For narration/stage directions:
Leave 0.5 to 1 second of silence at the beginning.

Say:
"Act # of You Never Can Tell, by George Bernard Shaw. This is a LibriVox recording. All LibriVox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer, please visit librivox.org."
At the end of each file say:
"End of Act #."
If you are recording the final section of the book, add:
"End of You Never Can Tell, by George Bernard Shaw."
Leave 5 seconds of silence at the end.

Filename:
For individual roles: younevercantell_role_#.mp3 where # is the act number. (e.g. younevercantell_romeo_1.mp3)
For final files: younevercantell_#_shaw_128kb.mp3 where # is the act number. (e.g. younevercantell_1_shaw_128kb.mp3)

Upload to the LibriVox Uploader: https://librivox.org/login/uploader
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(If you have trouble reading the image above, please contact an admin)

MC to select: toddhw

Copy and paste the file link generated by the uploader into a new post in this thread along with the file duration (mm:ss). Watch this thread for prooflistening notes.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask! Just post in this thread.

ktaylor07
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Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 6:01 am

We are looking for an MC and someone to read the part of Phillip Clandon.

ktaylor07
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Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 6:01 am

At the core of this reading is a reunion of the group who performed “The Importance of Being Earnest” in January with a few additions to fill out the cast list. We were going to post to the “Readers Found” forum, but we didn’t find a reader for the part of Philip. Our cast list is as follows:

Mr. (or Dr.) Valentine, the Dentist -Cavaet
Gloria Clandon, the eldest daughter -Elise
Walter, the waiter -aidrian
Dolly Clandon, twin to Philip -jennlea
Philip Clandon, twin to Dolly -Open
Mrs. Clandon, the mother -ktaylor
Mr. Fergus Crampton, the landlord and father -algypug
Mr. Finch McComas, a solicitor -Greggiardano
Bohun, a QC (Queens Counsel) -Ooothatsnifty
The Parlor-maid -Expralitemonk
The Narrator -alatheron
Last edited by ktaylor07 on April 10th, 2021, 6:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

ktaylor07
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 6:02 am

Everyone – Please be vigilant when reading through the script. Shaw gets cute when identifying the characters in a few spots. Valentine is called “The Dentist” at the beginning of Act I. Dolly is “The Young Lady.” Philip is “The Young Gentleman.”
McComas is “The Gentleman” at the beginning of Act II.
Bohun is “The Stranger” in Act IV.
Dolly is “The Columbine.”
I think that’s it, but I might have missed one somewhere.

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » April 10th, 2021, 6:24 am

ktaylor07 wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 6:01 am
We are looking for an MC and someone to read the part of Phillip Clandon.
I can do both of that.

EDIT: MW ready to be filled in.

Thanks, Todd

ktaylor07
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Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
Location: North Carolina
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 6:28 am

ToddHW wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 6:24 am
ktaylor07 wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 6:01 am
We are looking for an MC and someone to read the part of Phillip Clandon.
I can do both of that.

EDIT: MW ready to be filled in.

Thanks, Todd
All right!! You the man!!

jennlea
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Joined: February 10th, 2019, 9:44 pm

Post by jennlea » April 10th, 2021, 8:52 am

Checking in! Looking forward to this!
-Jenn B.
My Recordings

alanmapstone
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Post by alanmapstone » April 10th, 2021, 9:11 am

Title should be "You never can tell"
alan
the sixth age shifts into the slippered pantaloon with spectacles on nose

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » April 10th, 2021, 9:24 am

I think I have fixed this everywhere.

Thanks, Todd

alatheron
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Post by alatheron » April 10th, 2021, 9:38 am

Hi everyone, glad to be a part of this!

Question regarding the narration during dialogue. It seems there are several ways to narrate the speaker and stage directions. Which of the following would you prefer? Thanks, Andrew

Bold text = read by narrator

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.
Andrew

ktaylor07
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 9:49 am

alanmapstone wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 9:11 am
Title should be "You never can tell"
Ooops, sorry! Dyslexia kicking in! :oops:

ktaylor07
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 9:51 am

ToddHW wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 9:24 am
I think I have fixed this everywhere.

Thanks, Todd
Thank you, sir!

ktaylor07
Posts: 1011
Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 9:58 am

alatheron wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 9:38 am
Hi everyone, glad to be a part of this!

Question regarding the narration during dialogue. It seems there are several ways to narrate the speaker and stage directions. Which of the following would you prefer? Thanks, Andrew

Bold text = read by narrator

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.

THE DENTIST (putting it down on the ledge of his cabinet of instruments). That was my first tooth.
THE YOUNG LADY (aghast). Your first! Do you mean to say that you began practising on me?
THE DENTIST. Every dentist has to begin on somebody.
The first example is correct. The rule of thumb is if the stage direction comes immediately after the character's name -- read both. If the stage direction comes in the middle of the line -- just read the stage direction. Remember to leave a 3 to 5 second pause in between all stage directions to make it easier for the editor (me) to insert lines.

I think Todd has written up a nice summary of directions for narrators recently in the One Act Play thread. Let me see if I can find it and copy it here...

I'm back... Here are Todd's instructions for reading stage directions:

"For the stage directions, you need to read everything that is not read by the actors. So each time you see "closes door" or "drinks wine" or "exit left", you would need to read. Often it's written in italics or between brackets, but not always, so finding all the directions can be tricky business.

There is a special rule that concerns reading the characters' names. It's quite easy to remember:

1) if the stage direction appears at the beginning of the speech, you include the character's name.
Example:
John (sitting down on the couch): "I feel a headache coming on."
you would read everything I underlined now, including the name.

2) if the stage direction is in the middle or at the end of the speech, you do not repeat the name, because it's already clear who is speaking.
Example:
John: "I feel a headache coming on." (sits down on the couch) "I think I need a rest." (dozes off)
both times, no name included, only the underlined parts would be read.

Please leave at least 4-5 seconds between each chunk. So each time the narration is interrupted by a character speech, you leave ample space. It makes copy/pasting easier for our editor (me).

Also - record a voice credit for yourself: "Stage directions, read by XXXX"

ToddHW
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Post by ToddHW » April 10th, 2021, 10:26 am

Feel free to copy those instructions or other notes I have posted.

However, above in your post I just added the missing underlining into the example stuff you copied. If you copy and there are special format things like bold or underline, you need to pretend to be editing or quoting the message so that the html code that is added for the format things gets included. Otherwise you get only sorta what you saw, not what you need to have to see it the way you saw it. Not WYSIWYG, but rather NWYNTHTSITWYSI.

Thanks, Todd

ktaylor07
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Joined: January 3rd, 2020, 12:33 pm
Location: North Carolina
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Post by ktaylor07 » April 10th, 2021, 10:45 am

ToddHW wrote:
April 10th, 2021, 10:26 am
Feel free to copy those instructions or other notes I have posted.

However, above in your post I just added the missing underlining into the example stuff you copied. If you copy and there are special format things like bold or underline, you need to pretend to be editing or quoting the message so that the html code that is added for the format things gets included. Otherwise you get only sorta what you saw, not what you need to have to see it the way you saw it. Not WYSIWYG, but rather NWYNTHTSITWYSI.

Thanks, Todd
Thanks -- Right after I posted this, I realized that I probably should have let you add anything since you are here. I get overexcited when I start a new play... Sorry!

It would be convenient to have this sort of instructions on how to read stage directions or how-to's for newcomers posted as a stickie at the top of the thread so BCs could point folks there.

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